November 2013

On Thanksgiving, when we Americans sit around our Thanksgiving dinner tables expressing gratitude for what we've been given are we in denial about what we've taken? This is a question I've been considering as the holiday festivities are approaching. Seems to me that that the table-dominating turkey with its sleep-inducing polyurethanes overlooks the actual originof this holiday. 


Virginia's House of Hope will present another evening of music and charitable outreach that will feature a set of classical music by a group of renowned and worldly performers followed by a reception upstairs at Carnegie Hall with the works.  100% of the proceeds from this event will go towards children in need in the Tri State area with our various charitable efforts, one of which includes a music program in local public schools where music has been taken away due to budget cuts. Help give back with a night of culture and prestige at our 6th annual charity concert!


Our oceans are indeed in a terrible state, thanks primarily to unrestrained commercial and industrial activity. Overfishing and pollution have decimated once abundant stocks of fish and other marine life, and the damaging practices continue to this day despite international agreements outlawing them.


The debut EP by Jared Gelman, Lonely Castle in the Cool Crowd has no shortage of party beats and electronic dance vibes. But, lyrically the tone is very different from the sound, which makes this collection entirely unique. Combining his love of music and poetry, Jared paints a picture of his teenage years as they come to life through the speakers. Available for free download today.


Elections come and go and the results sometimes actually change things. We now have bike lanes in SoHo and almost everyone from out of town is now happy. The billboard people are happy despite years of complaints and lobbying the politicians in office, we have more of them. And, real estate people are also happy. Original art, affordable housing, including rent control stabilization and development rights, have all inured to their best interests. The art and artists are nearly gone; stabilization and affordable housing and controlling 45 story buildings, is an ephemeral dream; and the fight to protect SoHo from even further debasement in the form of the SoHo BID, is all but over.

 

The lot bordered by Grand, Varick, Canal Streets and Avenue of the Americas, just west of Duarte Square, is about to feature prominently in the ‘rezoning of Hudson Square.’  Over the last few years, the lot has hosted, through LentSpace, various art installations, events, live music, gourmet food trucks and lessons on how to take care of city tress by the Million Tree Inititive.

 


Born in Lancaster County, PA in1984, Eric received his BFA with highest honors at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, NY. During his four years at Pratt he received the top foundation award as well as sophomore and junior year painting scholarships.


Breedlove was the very first friend I made in New York when I moved here two years ago. Soon after, he started his weekly Magic Monday event at St. Jerome’s and I’ve been attending it ever since. After I first heard his song “Oh, Pierre!” I started dreaming up videos for his songs. Last May, he asked me to direct the new, Chew Fu-produced version of “New York City Rooftop” and I was so excited to move forward immediately. 


ArtCross has brought work by more than 30 Japanese artists to NYC and promises a show out of the ordinary. Japanese artists will be present, and you don't want to miss the live calligraphy demonstration at the opening reception for Culture on Friday, November 15th.

For starters, I want to be clear that this anecdote is safe for atheists!
My parents brought me up as an atheist. Though my dad was being trained to be a rabbi in his native Poland, experiences he underwent while studying at the “chayda” made him decide that if God allowed abusive treatment to children, there was no God. Now, I have no idea what actually happened. He came from a heritage of rabbis, and his mother was intent on having him follow in the footsteps of the males in his family. In explaining his decision to me, my father related that the students had to take down their pants and receive beatings. In light of the recent reports of sexual violations in the clergy, I suspect it might have been worse than beatings, but, of course, my father would never have shared that... even with his family. 


The cliché of stiff-upper-lip Britons who rarely show emotion is beautifully discredited in the Roundabout Theatre Company’s new production of Terence Rattigan’s The Winslow Boy in association with The Old Vic, directed by Lindsay Posner. Rattigan, a pillar of British theatre in the mid-twentieth century, managed to find the heartbeat under the calm continence of his characters. Rattigan’s case is helped by the stellar cast of this revival who give life to the Winslow family’s problems and feelings, sustained by Peter McKintosh’s sumptuously upper middle class set and costumes that tell as much about the characters as the writing and the acting.


How long is the shadow of a battle, an explosion, a revolution? Whatstories arise in the wake of devastation? The latest issue of Granta explores the aftermath and legacy of conflict in fiction, poetry, and reportage. To launch it, join writer and historian Patrick French, on how the heroism of his great-uncle in World War I left behind a "saturating cult of remembrance," and novelist and critic Hari Kunzru, on the sinister lure of disaster tourism.