October 2014

My Russian-born mother was 4'11” and wore a 4 ½ size shoe. Believe it or not, that was the sample size in the 1930s and 1940s. She prided herself on her dainty feet – the rest of her wasn't quite as dainty – as she found exquisite footwear that she felt proud to wear, and that was reasonably priced. In my teens, I was 5'4” weighed 125, and wore a size 61/2 shoe. It was looking as if each new generation was gaining inches on the preceding generation.


The High Line is gearing up for their fourth-annual, family-friendly Halloween celebration on Saturday, October 25. Come in costume to trick-or-treat on the High Line, where dangerous trains loom, hero cowboys rule, and super-kids help to change their city. Meet ghosts from the West Side’s industrial past, turn your fears into kites to be set free, explore a haunted train tunnel made by puppet master Ralph Lee, dance to the horns of the Trummytones, and hear stories performed by the Story Pirates.


Does anyone else love, love, love the Village Halloween Parade? Like it’s the only holiday tradition you truly worship? The theme for this year’s New York City's 41st Annual Village Halloween Parade is "The Garden of Earthly Delights." Gahh, so good. Like always, the parade will travel along Sixth Avenue from Spring Street to 16th Street on Friday, October 31st from 7PM-10:30PM and will air on Time Warner Cable's NY1 from 8PM-9:30PM.


California made big news recently when it announced the first statewide ban on plastic shopping bags set to kick in during the middle of 2015. Beginning in July, large grocery stores, pharmacies and other food retailers in the Golden State will no longer be able to send shoppers home with plastic bags, while convenience markets, liquor stores and other small food retailers will join the ranks a year later.


Zipping on my boots, I left the TV on and chanced on the Queen Latifah Show. I find her very likable­­ charming, and non plastic in presentation or surgery. So, when she began her show with an earnest appeal for us to get our “girls” checked, I sat up and paid attention.


Tom Stoppard’s Indian Ink is a sweet, melancholic reverie on family, art, England and India, an elegy for lost cultures, friends and family. Set in both India and England in 1930 and 1980 the play shows the how time ravages countries, customs and memory. In a first rate production, directed with an eye for nuance and detail by Carey Perloff and starring the luminous Rosemary Harris and Romola Garai, the Roundabout does itself proud.


Because we are all exceptionally lucky human beings, horror master R.L. Stine is writing a new set of Fear Street books. Bob and his editor Kat will be at McNally Jackson the night before Halloween to discuss Fear Street, his career, and ventriloquist dummies (we assume), among other things.


Last week, the streets of Manhattan were transformed into powerful rallying sites. Marchers from all over the world joined forces to protest the destruction of our soil, air and water. Focusing mostly on climate changes and the dangers of fracking, over half a million marchers bravely struck back at the forces that refuse to recognize the severity of the climate problem.


One of our favorites, Kent Fine Art opens it’s fall season with FLEX, curated by Orlando Tirado. The exhibition explores shape, mass, and form of the body in relation to an emerging queer, transgender, renegade post-minimalist strategy that strips the body of its flesh, framework, and constraints.


We, The Outsiders brings together works by an international quartet of artists, and will be on view through October 31. It’s an art exhibition that explores several perplexing questions: “Can it be said that art has a consciousness of its own? And if such a consciousness were independent of us, where would it place us in relation to itself?” The exhibition revolves around a gigantic egg—which probes, like the classic chicken-and-the-egg conundrum where consciousness begins and ends when it comes to art.