December 2014

When the phrase “Holy Days” appears, it has a sombre quality. It elicits images of tranquil, serious contemplation – a time set aside to appreciate the gift of Life, and to clear one's soul of rancor and resentment. In direct contrast, the word, “Holiday” a clear derivative, brings forth visions of celebration, feasting ... PRESENTS!


It's thoroughly disgusting that companies invest millions for research on what consumers will believe, and BUY. Though their claims are usually false and misleading, which is bad enough, they often are outright DANGEROUS.


In The Last Ship rock star/actor/songwriter Sting honors his childhood home where shipbuilding was both the economic backbone, and the emotional sinew that kept the town together.  The show is a dark, but loving, paean to community and family, a Capra-esque, morality tale with characters who are either good—on the side of those wanting to build “the last ship”—or bad—those working for the evil capitalists who have bought the shipyard.


PS3 will be hosting it’s very first Holiday Bazaar open to the entire community on Saturday, December 13th, 11am - 4pm. Shop artisanal gifts for the whole family, indulge in delicious baked goods at the PS3 Cafe and dance the day away with music from a live DJ! This is a great way to support local businesses and celebrate PS3 and it’s community.


Terrence McNally’s It’s Only a Play is not one of his better efforts. In fact, it’s a terrible play! But, you know what? Who cares? When a show keeps you laughing for two and a half hours, fly to the theater, beg, borrow or steal tickets and indulge yourself! Theater mavens and drama queens might have a slight edge in getting the jokes, but there is enough brilliantly choreographed mayhem and pointed zingers to keep anyone rolling in the aisles. Add a world-class cast and it’s easy to see why this show, first staged in 1986, has become such a hit, tweaked and updated by Mr. McNally.


When I was a child (a hundred years ago), anyone who was overweight aimed for a 10 pound weight loss. That would have made a substantial difference, as no one I knew was obese. The Yiddish word “Zaftik” pretty much described a woman who, in those days, had some extra flesh, yet was sexy and in no way fat!